Get the proven playbook to heal a broken heart. The Korean traditional rice wine recipe starts off by. "Incorporating some of the Japanese traditions of drinking with people of certain positions and how to respect them, "Gave me the proper knowledge of how to serve, as well as some differences in sake.". Place the tokkuri in a bowl with water about 40 degrees Celsius. Ginjo sake is usually chilled, while the junmai class should be drank at room temperature or slightly chilled. Last Updated: November 5, 2020 Unopened sake is best consumed within a year and sometimes earlier, so drink your sake while it's still fresh. Put the rice in a basket and place it in a sunny place. Always drink in moderation. Many establishments in Japan have unique handmade vessels for drinking sake, which adds to the experience. If you’re drinking directly from the masu, you can enjoy the unique aroma imparted to the sake by the masu vessel. Every day at wikiHow, we work hard to give you access to instructions and information that will help you live a better life, whether it's keeping you safer, healthier, or improving your well-being. Spread the rice out on a baking sheet to cool. In addition, in Japanese culture, it’s expected to pour for your companions and not for yourself, and if you’re on pouring duty, to make sure that everyone else has a drink before serving yourself. The Japanese use a ceramic or wooden pitcher, called a tokkuri, and matching cups called guinomi or ochoko. Unlike wine, sake does not improve with age. Known as “nihonshu” in Japanese, which means “Japanese alcohol”, sake is a white wine-like drink, clear or light in color in appearance, but with a production process more similar to beer. Many people insist on drinking from the edge of the container, while others swear by drinking from the corners. Sake is considered "warm" when bubbles well at the bottom but do not rise, and "hot" when the bubbles rise. The correct temperature for warm sake is between 100 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. It is best to drink your sake within 2 hours of opening and within a week of purchase. Sake is considered "warm" when bubbles well at the bottom but do not rise, and "hot" when the bubbles rise. Sake is typically served from a vase-like jar called a tokkuri, or sometimes from an open pitcher called a katakuchi. Today, sake is still used at Shinto shrines in religious ceremonies such as formal Japanese weddings, but is also now enjoyed at bars, restaurants, and other casual settings in Japan, and is increasingly available in bars and restaurants around the world. This will help you find the best way to serve it. 5 If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 569,353 times. During the fermentation process gas is released, this needs to be able to escape the pot. Warm or hot sake goes well with hot foods such as hot pot, foods cooked with a lot of fat or oil, or dishes flavored with soy sauce. Makgeolli Ingredients. An extra bit of warmth from your mouth quickly brings the wine to body temperature, at which point its profusion of aromas becomes accessible. Do not allow it to sit. The authentic Japanese manner of serving rice wine is complex and closely related to Japanese manners and customs. Ginjo sake is usually chilled, while the junmai class should be drank at room temperature or slightly chilled. Put the jar of sake into the pot and check it periodically. The Best Food & Drink Advent Calendars for 2020 Makgeolli is a brewed rice wine, traditionally made of just 3 ingredients: rice, water and nuruk. In Japanese culture, it is impolite to hold the tokkuri and pour sake with one hand when you're in a formal situation. Sake oxidises rapidly when it is opened, and warming a liquid will speed up any chemical reactions taking place. Pour your sake into a pitcher if you're serving it the Japanese way. The amount depends on how sweet you want it. Lighter sakes can be served with fish, especially Japanese preparations such as sushi or sashimi. Required fields are marked *. sliced vegetables, rice wine vinegar, vegetable oil, sugar, soy sauce and 5 more. With their angled bowls and delicate stems, dessert-wine glasses look nice, but they're not the best choice for ice wine. Pour your sake into a pitcher if you're serving it the Japanese way. Sake can be served chilled, but it depends on what type of sake it is. Your email address will not be published. They go well when paired with cold or plainly flavored foods. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/4\/47\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-1-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-1-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/4\/47\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-1-Version-3.jpg\/aid135830-v4-728px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-1-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"410","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/2\/2d\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-7-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-7-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/2\/2d\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-7-Version-2.jpg\/aid135830-v4-728px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-7-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"410","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/bc\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-11-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-11-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/bc\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-11-Version-2.jpg\/aid135830-v4-728px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-11-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"410","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/6d\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-12-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-12-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/6d\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-12-Version-2.jpg\/aid135830-v4-728px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-12-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"410","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/94\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-14-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-14-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/94\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-14-Version-2.jpg\/aid135830-v4-728px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-14-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"410","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/1b\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-15-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-15-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/1b\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-15-Version-2.jpg\/aid135830-v4-728px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-15-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"410","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/5d\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-16-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-16-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/5\/5d\/Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-16-Version-2.jpg\/aid135830-v4-728px-Serve-and-Drink-Sake-Step-16-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"410","licensing":"